drama

All posts tagged drama

The Tent

There seems to be a lot of apocalypse, end-of-worldy stuff being released at the minute (see our recent review of The One Survivor of Conifer). But The Tent takes this scenario to a completely different place. Now, let’s make one thing clear; it’s not a horror movie (not in the traditional sense anyway) and not what we’d normally review. But, seeing the terms ‘thriller’, ‘apocalypse’ and ‘creature-feature’ being bandied around, I blindly went for it.

Synopsis

An apocalyptic event known as The Crisis has devastated David’s (Tim Kaiser) world leaving him to rely on survival tactics learned from childhood. Isolated and alone, David has taken refuge in a tent on the edge of the wilderness. Soon enough, another survivor emerges, Mary (Lulu Dahl), who immediately begins questioning David’s tactics and ultimately putting them in the crosshairs of “Those Who Walk In Darkness”, unseen creatures that may or may not be responsible for The Crisis.

The Tent

In all honesty, during the first half of the film I was tempted to switch it off. There didn’t seem to be a whole lot going on. The majority of the story revolved around David and Mary conversing in the tent. There was also the added threat of creatures outside whose POV was portrayed through black and white footage (similar to that seen in Dog Soldiers’ depiction of werewolves). Throw in a few random flashbacks of David’s life at the beginning of The Crisis, and some cleverly included homemade footage of him when he was younger, and I was shrouded in a cloud of obscurity.

But then…

However, the storyline did start to come together. Those flashbacks began to make sense and all the pieces began to fall into place, right up until the hard-hitting conclusion. It turned out that director Kyle Couch has done a stand up job in delivering the message he wanted to portray. It could have possibly worked better as a short movie. But, saying that, it may not have been as impactive. The acting, although initially average at the beginning, improved tenfold by the halfway point. Kaiser and Dahl both did a tremendous job in delivering the emotionally-charged ending.

The Tent

Now, I’m not gonna lie, this film left me an emotional wreck! As it progressed, you could see the direction it was heading, but that didn’t stop the huge punch in the gut that it delivered at the end. As the last ten minutes began to unfold I wanted nothing more than to cling onto the cloud of obscurity! what it was unveiling was more horrifying than any creature-feature could be.

Check out the trailer below and let us know what you think. The movie is currently available on demand, and coming soon to DVD.

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The Redeeming Review

Synopsis

The synopsis for The Redeeming states; ‘A disturbed single mother confronts a mysterious stranger and the echoes of her past to protect her home.’

Vague, ominous and yearning for more. The movie centres around Joyce (Tracey Ann Wood) who lives alone in a secluded country house. From the outset we’re given a glimpse into the woman’s tentative psyche, which is only exacerbated with the introduction of John (Ryan Wichert) The young man has apparently injured his arm and seeks refuge in her home. Joyce obliges and not only lets the man in, but tends to his wounds as well. As the movie progresses it becomes apparent that not all is as it seems. The pair, despite apparently not knowing each other, seem to share a dark bond.

The Redeeming

Review

As far as psychological thrillers go, director Brian Barnes does a great job of building suspense and keeping us on our toes. Personally, I thought from the outset that it was going to be a straightforward, cliche-ridden plot, but as the movie progressed I realised how wrong I was. The movie keeps you guessing throughout, with both characters portraying a secretive, almost sinister side at times. Think Misery with a paranormal twist and you’ll be close to the plot.

The Redeeming

The Redeeming was made with a considerably low budget, yet Barnes managed to overcome this through great casting and good cinematography. The only thing lacking for me was the intensity. There seemed to be a slight reluctance from both parties to be physically assertive when the time came. Whether this was down to the low budget and the subsequent “don’t damage my house” rule, or just an oversight in general, it was the only negative I could really find. However, with a convincing portrayal of diminishing mental health, a decent rapport between the pair, and a satisfying ending, the movie more than makes up for this.

The movie is available on demand from a variety of sources. Click here to find out more

To find out more about Brian Barnes, click here

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