Book Review

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Her Infernal Name & Other Nightmares

Her Infernal Name & Other Nightmares is Robert Ottone’s second collection of horror fiction, and what a collection it is! There’s no specific theme throughout, with a wide variety of topics that should entertain the vast majority of horror fans. Stories covering extraterrestrial life, the undead, gaming, animals, ants and… sugar. The diversity of the topics reflects Ottone’s creative flair and this is evident in every story.

Synopsis

From waking fears to heart-breaking nightmares, this collection of short fiction is a glimpse into the terrors we face every day from the mind of Robert P. Ottone.

In “The Arborist,” a woman hears the mysterious call of the forest.

Five friends exploring an archipelago find themselves set upon by the island’s hungry inhabitants in “The Monitors.”

A young woman confronts the mystery of her infertility in “Kelly Watch the Stars.”

These works are joined by the title novella, Her Infernal Name which is about the cruel intersection of desire and desperation, and many other stories crafted in the hopes of keeping you up at night.

As with many anthologies, the collection contains stories of varying lengths with some just over 4 pages, yet each as impactive as the last. If you are looking for a series of short stories that will give you chills, a sense of unease, or just to satisfy your bloodlust, then this collection is for you.

You can purchase Her Infernal Name & Other Nightmares from Amazon here or Amazon UK here

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Diabolica Britannica

The Covid-19 pandemic has certainly had a significant impact on the world. A topic that will be discussed for countless years to come, many will talk about the death, destruction and havoc that it caused. However, the pandemic is not all doom and gloom. It has also unearthed a long-forgotten camaraderie that we, as humans, possess. Fundraising, compassion and unity has become a way of life these past few months and it doesn’t look set to end any time soon.

The Diabolica Britannica, is another prime example of all of these traits. Bringing together 14 great authors, the anthology is the brainchild of Keith Anthony Baird. The charitable collection offers an immediate incentive to buy, as all profits go to the NHS! If that alone entices you, links to purchase the anthology are at the bottom of the page. But wait, there’s more!

Diabolica Britannica

Synopsis

Diabolica Britannica is a collection of 14 dark tales from the dark isles. It features contributions from the following authors: Adam L G Nevill, Tim Lebbon, Keith Anthony Baird, John F Leonard, Morgan K Tanner, Arthur M Harper, Christopher Henderson, Beverley Lee, Sarah E England, Catherine McCarthy, Stephanie Ellis, Janine Pipe, Sarah J Budd and Alyson Faye.

Horror maestro Ramsey Campbell provides a foreword, giving us an insight into what kind of terror the subsequent pages contain. From there the anthology starts with a hard-hitting tale from Catherine McCarthy and ups the pace with every story from there on! Now, ordinarily we’d focus on the stories that stand out from the rest. Yet, each one is genuinely as good as the last! From beautifully descriptive narratives, to tense, nail biting tales, Diabolica Britannica has it all. Whether you’re a blood and gore ghoul, purveyor of the paranormal or just love a good old fashioned Lovecraftian prose, this anthology is for you!

Overrall, the Diabolica Britannica is a great read for any horror fan. Not only that, but you can also bask in the knowledge that you’re contributing to a worthy cause!

You can purchase the books using the following links;

Amazon UK Amazon US

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Strange Days Anthology

Synopsis

Strange Days Anthology – New extraordinary fiction for extraordinary times. Here are 34 stories and one poem that anticipate possible futures that – with coronavirus currently creating havoc around the world – may not be too far from the truth unless we take our survival as a species far more seriously. The idea for this anthology came to me before the current crisis began and all of the stories published here were written before what would have been considered as science fiction became horrifying science fact.

The range of scenarios depicted here are various, from the fantastic to the frighteningly real, but one thing they all have in common is their quality. These are, to my mind, the best of the best, chosen from about 300 submissions. The 35 authors published in this anthology, spanning a massive 500 pages, represent exceptional talent and ability in the art of the written word. Immerse yourself, if you dare, in frightening worlds that span the extremes of literary horror. Read these extraordinary stories, from some of the most imaginative minds around. There are no reprints here, just outstanding and very relevant fiction. I hope you agree. Trevor Denyer – Editor

Find Out More

At 511 pages the Strange Days Anthology is certainly one that will keep you occupied. Made up of 34 stories, you’d think there’d be some similarities of themes, style or content, but surprisingly there’s none! Each story is a unique portrayal of the writer’s creativity and the themes included range from the bizarre to the down right terrifying!

We’re talking everything from butterflies to monkeys, car journeys to flights. Some contain creepy, sinister plots, whereas others are downright gut-wrenching (literally in the Hungry Mouths story!) There really is something for everyone! Check it out and be sure to let us know your favourites.

You can buy the book here

You can read more about other available anthologies at;
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Dog Soldiers and Dog Houses review

I know a lot of our readers, and certainly all of us at Erebus Horror, would regard themselves as knowledgeable when it comes to horror movies. Yet, if someone asked you to name the British horror flicks released in the last 20 years, how would you get on? Sure, you’ll probably start with the most popular ones; 28 Days Later, Shaun of the Dead, Dog Soldiers etc. But how many could you name before you get stuck? 10? 20? Maybe 50 for the more devoted of fans? The truth is, try as we might, we will all fail in comparison to MJ Simpson – author of Dog Soldiers and Dog Houses. Simpson truly is a pioneer and expert in the field of British horror films and this book proves why.

The work is a truly insightful encyclopedia, reviewing hundreds of British horror movies, many never before documented. Being UK-based and particularly interested in British horror flicks, we all thought we had a comprehensive knowledge of movies from the motherland – Oh, how wrong we were!

MJ Simpson, doyen of British horror film writers, has seen them. The good, the bad and the extraordinary. For 20 years he has been scouring the web for these films. He has then reviewed them on his blog British Horror Revival and in his previous book Urban Terrors.

Between January 2000 and December 2019, an incredible one thousand feature-length horror films were produced and released in the UK. Dog Soldiers and Doghouses is the first in a unique series of books cataloguing this amazingly prolific and largely undocumented corner of cinema.

Covering a 12-year period from 2000 to 2011, this book reviews 316 British horror movies. Cast and crew details, critical analysis, production history and release data are all wrapped up in an entertaining and informative half-page review, accompanied by a colour image.

From big screen blockbusters to backyard obscurities, from cinema screens to YouTube, with budgets ranging from £20 million to 45 quid (or less…), British horror cinema has never been so diverse. This book and its forthcoming companions are a guide to the true, hidden ‘British film industry’ which remains almost entirely ignored by the mainstream film press.

About the author

MJ Simpson is, apparently, the world’s foremost authority on 21st century British horror films and these books are the culmination of two decades of passionate research. He is the author of Urban Terrors: New British Horror Cinema 1997-2008 (Hemlock Books, 2012), which covers about a third of these films in more detail and context. He also wrote a couple of books about Douglas Adams.

Part of the original editorial team which launched SFX, Simpson has written for Fangoria, The Dark Side, Video Watchdog, Psychotronic Video, Shivers, Scream, DeathRay, Infinity, MonsterScene, SciFi Now, Starburst, TV Zone, Cult TV, Film Review, Neo, Doctor Who Magazine, Total Film, New Scientist, the British Medical Journal, the Funday Times and the Singaporean version of Elle.

He works by day in the Communications Office at the University of Leicester and sang the 1980s classic ‘Africa’ on what many people consider to be the worst TV show ever made.

About the book

21st Century British Horror Films, Volume 1: Dog Soldiers and Doghouses is a limited edition publication available exclusively online at https://mjsimpson.bigcartel.com for £20 plus postage*. It is 176 pages, A4, softback, and full colour throughout, with a foreword by horror expert Dr Johnny Walker.

* In an unprecedented offer, postage is free for anyone who wrote, directed, produced or starred in any film in the book!

Take it from us, it doesn’t matter if you’re a filmmaker, working within the movie industry or even if you’re British, this book is a valuable resource for any horror movie buff. Check it out and let us know what you think.

Did you enjoy the Dog Soldiers and Dog Houses review? Check out what we think of more literature here

Worship Me. The spine-chilling, gut-wrenching debut demon horror novel from Craig Stewart!

Something is listening to the prayers of St. Paul’s United Church, but it’s not the god they asked for; it’s something much, much older.

A quiet Sunday service turns into a living hell when this ancient entity descends upon the house of worship and claims the congregation for its own. The terrified churchgoers must now prove their loyalty to their new god by giving it one of their children or in two days time it will return and destroy them all.

As fear rips the congregation apart, it becomes clear that if they’re to survive this untold horror, the faithful must become the faithless and enter into a battle against God itself. But as time runs out, they discover that true monsters come not from heaven or hell…
…they come from within.

Pretty deep, right? That’s the synopsis of ‘Worship Me’, the debut novel of Craig Stewart, and WHAT a debut it is!

The book delves deep into human morality and portrays traits and attitudes which I think are synonymous with the current climate we’re living in. Quarantine, lockdown and fear has brought out the worst in some people, showing human nature for what it potentially can be. Given that ‘Worship Me’ was released prior to the pandemic, Stewart has knowingly portrayed these traits in his characters which in itself is an applaudable feat.

As I’m sure you’ve worked out from the above synopsis, the book centres around demonology, with The Behemoth as the demonic antagonist. Whilst the congregation are faced with an agonising choice, it’s not long before they start to turn on each other. As the story progressed I just started to read faster and faster; desperate to know how it all panned out.

The book itself is written in a way that totally immerses the reader making you feel like you’re actually part of the congregation. It’s detailed, with well-written characters and a great storyline. Blood and gore flow profusely through the pages, with Stewart not afraid to describe the splatterfest in great detail.

The only aspect of the book I wasn’t fond of was the beginning. It took a while to get going, but once it did there was no stopping. This isn’t necessarily a criticism – after all, the best rollercoasters in the world start with a slow, tension-building ascent before you’re plunged into an abyss of fear, excitement and shock. ‘Worship Me’ does just that.

Check out the book on Amazon here

Alternatively, if you want to read more about Craig Stewart and what he’s up to these days, check out his website here

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